fuckyeahillustrativeart:

By Max Temescu (www.temescuart.com)
Follow them on Tumblr! temescuart.tumblr.com

fuckyeahillustrativeart:

By Max Temescu (www.temescuart.com)

Follow them on Tumblr! temescuart.tumblr.com

Anonymous asked: Ms. Kahn, I just read your article posted at Comics Alliance, and I am sorry you've had to endure those abuses against your human dignity. It is not okay that you should be made to suffer that kind of behavior. I admire your bravery in speaking up, and while I don't pretend to have an answer to the paradox you find yourself in, I hope your example will inspire more women to come forward, and your combined voices help make the hobby a safer place for women.

Thank you for these kind words, anon. <3 Sucky as things often are, I truly believe we’re moving towards a better future.

zoetica:

I’ve been collecting these images from Galliano’s perfect, gaudy, vaguely-Russia-inspired F/W 2009 tidbits for a few months now, mostly for art and styling reference, but also because they make me happy.

cherryseltzer:

afatfox:

blouse ~ modcloth (4x)
skirt ~ modcloth (4x)
socks ~ sockdreams
shoes ~ journeys 
bowtie ~ asos
purse ~ modcloth
lips ~ revlon’s just bitten in crush

cuuuuuuutest

Looking for freelance!

janelleasselin:

As many people know, I’ve been dealing with some health stuff over the last few months that’s been super frustrating. I haven’t been able to drive most days and mobility is occasionally an issue, although I have no trouble being on a computer when it’s my laptop at home. It’s for that reason that I’m no longer on staff at Sideshow and will now be looking to take on some freelance. I have my contacts that I’m going to hit up for writing/editing stuff (you’re forewarned!) but if anyone can spread the word it would be much appreciated.

In case you don’t know me, I have almost a decade of experience as a comic book editor, a Masters of Science in Publishing, and have been working as a journalist for a year in my spare time for sites like ComicsAlliance and Bitch. My focus has been almost entirely on comics and representation but I’m happy to write about other pop culture stuff and feminist issues and things related to all of the above. Editing is where my heart is and I definitely love to edit anything but particularly comics. More information about my background is all over this site. 

I will say that for the time being I’m going to be super discerning about what and how much freelance I take on in order to be as responsible as possible about my health and stress levels. Work I do take on will be given my full attention but if I have to turn down work offered it’s entirely for health reasons. My top priorities are getting well and not letting anyone down! Thanks for understanding!

Finally, you can email me at janelle.m.asselin at gmail dot com. 

avaruuskala:

In 10 years, I hope we can still be drinking tea together like we are now

decadot:

Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon — PC Engine SUPER CD-ROM² — Banpresto (1994)

decadot:

Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon — PC Engine SUPER CD-ROM² — Banpresto (1994)

ericafailsatlife:

I did this illustration for Juliet Kahn’s article about sexual harassment for Comics Alliance.
I suggest you all give it a read here: Fear As A Way Of Life: Why Women Don’t ‘Just Report’ Sexual Harassment

ericafailsatlife:

I did this illustration for Juliet Kahn’s article about sexual harassment for Comics Alliance.

I suggest you all give it a read here: Fear As A Way Of Life: Why Women Don’t ‘Just Report’ Sexual Harassment

Let’s hear it for Sayo Yamamoto!

mojomomo:

See this lady right here?

image

This lady’s Sayo Yamamoto and she’s responsible for and incredible number of anime titles. She’s been in the industry since around 2001, and has worked primarily as a storyboard artist and director. Here’s a brief list of things she’s done:

  • Lupin III: Mine Fujiko to Iu Onna - Series Director (first Lupin series in the franchise’s decade-old history to be directed by a woman)
  • Michiko to Hatchin - Series Director
  • Shingeki no Kyojin - ED Storyboard and Director
  • Evangelion 2.0 - Storyboard
  • Panty and Stocking - Episode Storyboard and Director
  • Samurai Champloo - Episode Storyboard and Director
  • Eureka Seven - Episode Storyboard and Director

There’s just so much more that I cannot fit it into this post, but ANN has you covered. Let’s hear it for this awesome woman! You go, Sayo!

coolthingsswd:

Ode to Apollo 11 and the joy of discovery

comicsalliance:

FEAR AS A WAY OF LIFE: WHY WOMEN IN COMICS DON’T ‘JUST REPORT’ SEXUAL HARASSMENT
By Juliet Kahn
“If the harassment is so bad, why don’t women just report it?”
“I want to believe these women, but if they’re not willing to come forth and put their name to these accusations, I just can’t.”
“These claims of harassment are all so overblown. I never see it happening.”
I have been a woman in the comics industry for a few months now. It has been wonderful. It has also been terrifying.
Terrifying in a way I’m used to, though. When you grow up enveloped in the miasma of “tits or GTFO,” “attention whore,” and “fake geek girl,” fear becomes the price you pay to enjoy your hobbies. You don’t even think of it as fear most of the time.
Sometimes you join in the fear mongering yourself, enjoying the a**hole glamour of not being too pussy to call another girl a slut. Sometimes you hide in woman-heavy spaces, which go maligned elsewhere (“Tumblrinas!”) but do a pretty solid job of keeping you safe. The fear comes back eventually, though, as a slew of graphic rape threats or a simple joke about “feminazis” you are expected to chuckle along with. It might be in response to a screed worthy of Andrea Dworkin—or maybe you just tweeted something about disliking Guardians of the Galaxy. What matters is that you were a woman with an opinion on the internet, and now you must be punished. You must be made to fear.
Fear is also meant to keep us safe from sexual harassment, assault and abuse. We’re told not to stay out too late, not to go out alone, not to drink, not to lead anyone on, not to go home with anyone, not to ever feel safe in any situation that a man might take advantage of. If you fear the (implicitly common) worst from the men around you, you will escape it. When harassment, assault, and abuse take place anyway, fear is often a distinctly purposeful element of the encounter. Sometimes, this is subtle—it might take place in a deliberately secluded spot, or the perpetrator might be in a position of power over your future. Or, in the case of rape-and-death-threat style online harassment, the naked point of it might be to instill fear. After the harassment, assault, or abuse has taken place, it is fear that keeps women from speaking out. Fear of being branded the whiny bitch, of enduring the Anita Sarkeesian experience, or having one’s career torpedoed by a thousand nerds high on a lifetime’s worth of entitlement and vitriol.
Fear is what keeps us silent. Fear is what keeps men from understanding the ubiquity of these experiences. Fear is what keeps us from attaching a name to our allegations. Fear is what makes harassment, assault, and abuse a rite of passage for women in this industry and the world beyond. Fear, in this society, is what makes you a woman. And fear, in extinguishing discussion of its cruelties, keeps us from understanding its nature and better dismantling it.
READ MORE

This was pretty heavy to write, but I really wanted to get it out there. Hope y&#8217;all enjoy.(Something I haven&#8217;t mentioned elsewhere&#8212;each of the hypothetical situations is taken from either my life, or that of a family member.)

comicsalliance:

FEAR AS A WAY OF LIFE: WHY WOMEN IN COMICS DON’T ‘JUST REPORT’ SEXUAL HARASSMENT

By Juliet Kahn

“If the harassment is so bad, why don’t women just report it?”

“I want to believe these women, but if they’re not willing to come forth and put their name to these accusations, I just can’t.”

“These claims of harassment are all so overblown. I never see it happening.”

I have been a woman in the comics industry for a few months now. It has been wonderful. It has also been terrifying.

Terrifying in a way I’m used to, though. When you grow up enveloped in the miasma of “tits or GTFO,” “attention whore,” and “fake geek girl,” fear becomes the price you pay to enjoy your hobbies. You don’t even think of it as fear most of the time.

Sometimes you join in the fear mongering yourself, enjoying the a**hole glamour of not being too pussy to call another girl a slut. Sometimes you hide in woman-heavy spaces, which go maligned elsewhere (“Tumblrinas!”) but do a pretty solid job of keeping you safe. The fear comes back eventually, though, as a slew of graphic rape threats or a simple joke about “feminazis” you are expected to chuckle along with. It might be in response to a screed worthy of Andrea Dworkin—or maybe you just tweeted something about disliking Guardians of the Galaxy. What matters is that you were a woman with an opinion on the internet, and now you must be punished. You must be made to fear.

Fear is also meant to keep us safe from sexual harassment, assault and abuse. We’re told not to stay out too late, not to go out alone, not to drink, not to lead anyone on, not to go home with anyone, not to ever feel safe in any situation that a man might take advantage of. If you fear the (implicitly common) worst from the men around you, you will escape it. When harassment, assault, and abuse take place anyway, fear is often a distinctly purposeful element of the encounter. Sometimes, this is subtle—it might take place in a deliberately secluded spot, or the perpetrator might be in a position of power over your future. Or, in the case of rape-and-death-threat style online harassment, the naked point of it might be to instill fear. After the harassment, assault, or abuse has taken place, it is fear that keeps women from speaking out. Fear of being branded the whiny bitch, of enduring the Anita Sarkeesian experience, or having one’s career torpedoed by a thousand nerds high on a lifetime’s worth of entitlement and vitriol.

Fear is what keeps us silent. Fear is what keeps men from understanding the ubiquity of these experiences. Fear is what keeps us from attaching a name to our allegations. Fear is what makes harassment, assault, and abuse a rite of passage for women in this industry and the world beyond. Fear, in this society, is what makes you a woman. And fear, in extinguishing discussion of its cruelties, keeps us from understanding its nature and better dismantling it.

READ MORE

This was pretty heavy to write, but I really wanted to get it out there. Hope y’all enjoy.

(Something I haven’t mentioned elsewhere—each of the hypothetical situations is taken from either my life, or that of a family member.)

To the 10 people who just sent me an ask telling me the gif is from Neighborhood Story

Thanks! I had no idea it had been made into an anime!