gerwulfa:

Sydney Day, Holy Knight of Violets, Seventh Sister of the Eight Daughters of Day

comicsalliance:

THE UNCERTAINTY OF CHANGE: A CLOSER LOOK AT THE ‘LEGEND OF KORRA’ BOOK 3 FINALE
By Juliet Kahn
I re-watched “Sozin’s Comet” last night, in the wake of The Legend of Korra’s third season finale. It was still wonderful, still grand and gorgeous and heavy with emotion. But it felt different this time. It felt…funnier.
And really, it is. Avatar: The Last Airbender‘s four-episode finale starts with a beach party. Sokka cracks jokes as he scrambles across a crumbling airship. The last spoken line is a blind joke. It is clear to me, in a way that it wasn’t when I first watched it, that these characters are young teens. Young teens dealing with genocidal dictatorships, Orwellian city-states and the general mayhem of war, absolutely, but their age lends the whole affair a constant, underlying levity. The adults that exist are kept at arm’s length from the action—present, but unmistakably marked as “grown-ups,” and thus distant. Youth, and all its connotations of hope and humor, are the engine of the show.
Legend of Korra, in contrast, is downright grim. The central team all falls between 17 and 20 years old, and 50-somethings like Lin and Tenzin are as present in the story as they are. Their relationships feel less timid, less blushy. Characters like Mako have solid careers and murky pasts involving gang membership. Azula was a terrifying and tragic villain, but baddies like Zaheer (and Amon, and Unalaq) wield philosophical weight alongside their grinning evil.
READ MORE

My review of the Korra finale/Book 3 in general. Enjoy~

comicsalliance:

THE UNCERTAINTY OF CHANGE: A CLOSER LOOK AT THE ‘LEGEND OF KORRA’ BOOK 3 FINALE

By Juliet Kahn

I re-watched “Sozin’s Comet” last night, in the wake of The Legend of Korra’s third season finale. It was still wonderful, still grand and gorgeous and heavy with emotion. But it felt different this time. It felt…funnier.

And really, it is. Avatar: The Last Airbender‘s four-episode finale starts with a beach party. Sokka cracks jokes as he scrambles across a crumbling airship. The last spoken line is a blind joke. It is clear to me, in a way that it wasn’t when I first watched it, that these characters are young teens. Young teens dealing with genocidal dictatorships, Orwellian city-states and the general mayhem of war, absolutely, but their age lends the whole affair a constant, underlying levity. The adults that exist are kept at arm’s length from the action—present, but unmistakably marked as “grown-ups,” and thus distant. Youth, and all its connotations of hope and humor, are the engine of the show.

Legend of Korra, in contrast, is downright grim. The central team all falls between 17 and 20 years old, and 50-somethings like Lin and Tenzin are as present in the story as they are. Their relationships feel less timid, less blushy. Characters like Mako have solid careers and murky pasts involving gang membership. Azula was a terrifying and tragic villain, but baddies like Zaheer (and Amon, and Unalaq) wield philosophical weight alongside their grinning evil.

READ MORE

My review of the Korra finale/Book 3 in general. Enjoy~

mariessad:

Some pictures from the Sailor Moon Art Show at Hub Comics last night! Such a fun show, so many beautiful arts and lovely people ❤︎❤︎

The Art is on display through September, so you should definitely go check it out! There are lots of pieces not shown in these pics, and many of these amazing sailor cuties are for sale.

Hub Comics - 19 Bow street, Somerville MA 02143

If you were a part of this show please add your info/tumblr to this post :)

So, that Sailor Moon art show I’ve been organizing happened on Saturday, and it was spectacular. We had such an incredible amount of talent in the room, and so many wonderful people, and the room got kind of sweaty but ONLY BECAUSE IT WAS SO PACKED. 

I can’t thank everyone who contributed or helped out enough. And eternal thanks to everyone here on tumblr who helped me spread the word over the past few months! I wish you all could have been there.

fashion-runways:

RAMI KADI Un Souffle d’Orient Collection

Dolce Gabbana ss14 + hair colors | inspired by (+)

(Source: imsebastainstan)

adhemarpo:

He Jiaying, peintre chinois contemporain

brianmichaelbendis:

Storm by Daniel Acuña

brianmichaelbendis:

Storm by Daniel Acuña

(Source: thebendisageofcomics)

slitherup:

welcome to hell ♥

slitherup:

welcome to hell 

comicsalliance:

‘BEE AND PUPPYCAT’ CREATOR NATASHA ALLEGRI TALKS ART, ANIME, SPARKLES AND DESSERT [EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW]
By Juliet Kahn
Natasha Allegri is leading a movement. A quiet, earnest, doe-eyed movement to be sure, but one that is unstoppable, and unquestioningly vital. Bee and Puppycat, her already widely beloved series produced for Frederator’s Cartoon Hangover channel, is about to relaunch, to widespread fan salivation. Her social media accounts swell with more and more followers every day. Puppycat plushes and inflatable swords were everywhere at San Diego Comic-Con, as was cosplay and fan art.
Allegri’s work, in its sincere, unfailingly sweet way, has announced to the world that animation aimed at an adult (or at least teen) female audience is not just viable — it is a verified path to critical and commercial success. ComicsAlliance sat down with her at SDCC to discuss her success, the importance of cuteness, and what we can expect from the new Bee and Puppycat animated series.
READ MORE

Here’s my interview with Natasha Allegri. As you can see, I spent 40 minutes on a sunlit hotel balcony rambling at her about Sky Dancers. Enjoy.

comicsalliance:

‘BEE AND PUPPYCAT’ CREATOR NATASHA ALLEGRI TALKS ART, ANIME, SPARKLES AND DESSERT [EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW]

By Juliet Kahn

Natasha Allegri is leading a movement. A quiet, earnest, doe-eyed movement to be sure, but one that is unstoppable, and unquestioningly vital. Bee and Puppycat, her already widely beloved series produced for Frederator’s Cartoon Hangover channel, is about to relaunch, to widespread fan salivation. Her social media accounts swell with more and more followers every day. Puppycat plushes and inflatable swords were everywhere at San Diego Comic-Con, as was cosplay and fan art.

Allegri’s work, in its sincere, unfailingly sweet way, has announced to the world that animation aimed at an adult (or at least teen) female audience is not just viable — it is a verified path to critical and commercial success. ComicsAlliance sat down with her at SDCC to discuss her success, the importance of cuteness, and what we can expect from the new Bee and Puppycat animated series.

READ MORE

Here’s my interview with Natasha Allegri. As you can see, I spent 40 minutes on a sunlit hotel balcony rambling at her about Sky Dancers. Enjoy.

(Source: jessicadudleys)

Never stop mocking dudes who complain about “SJ hugboxes,” then turn around and respond to the tiniest criticisms of their boobs-and-blood entertainment cocoons with avalanches of rape and death threats.

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Chalcopyrite and Dolomite - Sweetwater Mine, Reynolds County, Missouri

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Chalcopyrite and Dolomite - Sweetwater Mine, Reynolds County, Missouri

noxzaiden:

さらば だ.   After A Long Day.  

gameraboy:

Anastasia (1997)

gameraboy:

Anastasia (1997)

\\...........//: On Right-Wing Videogame Extremism

ellaguro:

"so i’ll admit - when i first heard about Depression Quest, i had a pretty mixed reaction. i was glad to see a more visible game examining serious issues that come with a thing like depression, and i knew enough about Zoe to know that she’d been sincerely and openly struggling with it. she has, in fact, claimed that making the game saved her life. but i was also skeptical because i felt like it was taking some of the more abstract themes of lots of personal Twine games that were being made around the time and branding them in a more universal, surface, mainstream way. "depression" is such a broad cultural concept that originates from any number of sources - the idea that it remains this inherently abstract, alien idea that must be navigated through and corrected doesn’t let us deeper into the very real sources it usually stems from. the fact is, depression is unfortunately a pretty normalized way of life. we live in a world that heavily encourages people towards developing intense anxiety and mental illness. and so i felt like other games had looked more into the source of these issues from more interesting angles, but weren’t being recognized by the culture because they weren’t so aggressively marketed.

regardless of my misgivings, any situations that have since developed around this game have digressed so far beyond any of the game’s original intentions and shortcomings and into a strange, terrifying sort of cultural battleground. something about Zoe in particular - maybe that her game was all of a sudden ubiquitous, maybe that she was a woman who openly and unapologetically shared her image online, maybe that she seemed to be everywhere, triggered the killswitch in the greater consciousness of this reactionary gamer contingent. and as such, Zoe has become the scapegoat for every bit of internalized misogyny and misdirected rage these people felt. she appears to them an amorphous assemblage of everything that is viewed as wrong with women - manipulativeness, sluttiness, being an ‘attention-whore’. the idea of trusting the word of a frighteningly narcissistic ex who’s out to ruin her reputation is fine with them, because it meshes with their worldview. suddenly they have a convenient situation that explains away all their disillusionment and misgivings with themselves and game culture. suddenly it’s about all game culture at large and ethics in game journalism…

…one of the biggest sources of paranoia i took from reading through my first 4chan thread about this issue is that social justice activism will inevitably destroy communities like 4chan. these people feel so disempowered in their lives that they head to communities like 4chan or reddit to be able to feel some sort of empowerment, to act out on something, to feel part of something bigger. this is where the whole mythos of Anonymous comes from. that a lone person with a computer has a tremendous power to take down the shadowy elite. but in that act, there’s no accountability, and no moral code. anyone with the resources can mobilize people to target anyone they see fit. sometimes it attacks against the interests of power, but just as often it’s a conservative, reactionary anger that comes out of disillusionment and fear, and gets constantly externalized onto marginalized people, especially women and queer people.

they struggle to understand and adjust to a rapidly shifting cultural landscape, in and out of games, that’s moving away from traditionally catering to them and their empathy-deficient values into something more culturally sensitive and aware. and so they find simple explanations for these complex phenomena that fit within their bigoted worldviews - boogeymans of evil, manipulative and misleading women like Zoe Quinn or Anita Sarskeesian. they view themselves as anti-authority and anti-power, even as their actions are tremendously conservative and tremendously serving of the interests of power. they view social justice activism (and indie games) as a product of the rich, elitist, and entitled who is using their agenda to infiltrate into major media outlets and ignore the common gamer market as an audience. they look to “normal guy” personalities like JonTron or Totalbiscuit, or Penny Arcade - who don’t serve any kind of larger journalistic ethics aside from “being funny” - to reflect their perceived values and lifestyles. they employ the same logic that you see applied against LGBT and marginalized people that leaders in power in places like Iran or Russia do - social justice is a realm of Western entitlement and indulgences that are actively destroying the ways of lives of average, common people. they continually assert that these social justice issues don’t matter compared to large political or global conflicts, and use it to justify their behavior. because social justice is the not a “real” realm, but one of the entitled babies who don’t care about global issues, their bullying is justified and will come to no real consequence in the end. the internet is, then, a playground for them to angrily act out their own paranoia and insecurities onto.”